Gig Posters

Posters: 156080 | Bands: 135806 | Designers: 11531                 
   
       RSS Feeds

Username:   Password: 
Register      

Social Networking Activity                 



 Bands  Designers  New Arrivals  Top Lists  Forums  Buy Posters  Submit  Merch Store  Advertise  Widgets  Help

Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Southtown Press's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Texas Hill Country
    Posts
    665
    Comments
    252

    Default mesh & exposure questions...

    Had a few questions -- didn't find quite what I was looking for in the forums...

    1. Can anyone recommend the best screen mesh count for printing on wood?

    what about on canvas?

    2. I understand a metal halide grow lamp and a piece of glass makes a good compression-style exposure system -- and a halogen work lamp will also do the trick...

    Will that halogen light still burn decent enough stencils? Would the extra money spent on the metal halide light provide substantially better/stronger results?

    Or would the improvement be primarily a matter of shorter exposure times?

    Thanks for any help...

    ~L
    Last edited by Southtown Press; 09-18-2008 at 05:01 PM.

  2. #2
    squeegeethree's Avatar

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Brooklyn, NYC
    Posts
    6,629
    Comments
    62

    Default

    Depends on what your how rough the canvas and wood are. Id start with as low as a 76 mesh and build up the surface until you can print with a 195 mesh.

  3. #3
    ohdanielsan's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    411
    Comments
    5

    Default

    yeah, definitely depends on the wood. a friend of mine is doing some prints on wood with a 230 mesh screen, but the wood is pretty smooth. also, halogen work lights should work fine. i have a 1500 watt light that i got for around $50 and it burns fine. metal halide is going to cost about 3-4x more, but if you have the cash go for it. you'll get faster burn times since it has a higher UV output than halogen.

  4. #4
    Premium Member
    Andymac's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Van Isle BC Canada
    Posts
    11,749
    Comments
    278

    Default

    we use 200 up to 305 on wood, but for it to work at all the wood must be smooth and should be filled/coated/sanded, otherwise the print ink pulls up the grain. if it is rough, it will print rough - you can't print in a depression or a crack.

    the time will depend on the intensity of the lamp. sometimes the UV intensity is not so apparent between halogen and MH - bulbs are all different in the spectral output, and its hard to find data on the wavelength of the light - tells you the UV range in nanometers, the best being 330-440 or 'actinic' (blue)
    Visible light is much higher in the scale - Lumins is only brightness.
    Andymac

    services www.squeegeeville.com
    equipment www.tmiscreenprinting.com

    Todo es empezar.

  5. #5
    squeegeethree's Avatar

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Brooklyn, NYC
    Posts
    6,629
    Comments
    62

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Andymac View Post
    we use 200 up to 305 on wood, but for it to work at all the wood must be smooth and should be filled/coated/sanded, otherwise the print ink pulls up the grain. if it is rough, it will print rough - you can't print in a depression or a crack.
    I just printed a halftone job on salvaged construction yard plywood and it turned out perfect cracks and all. It was a full bleed on a full 4'x8' sheet too. The key is a course mesh, an ink that doesn't dry too quickly, and a course dot. Otherwise Andy's is right, the key is smoothness.

    I posted all my info of that in another thread. You should do a search 'cause I'm gonna start eating and drinking now.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •