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  1. #1

    Join Date
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    Default Can't find a thread about this -- touching up burned screens

    I have been searching the forum for a half-hour. I give up.

    I burned a screen and due to having the light to close, one small-ish part that has emulsion shouldn't. I winged it, and scraped and scrubbed some of it out while I was washing out the emulsion, and got most of it, but some of it was not to be got, or was too close to detailed portions for my winging it.

    Is there a way to remove smaller bits? Do people paint on small amounts of emulsion remover or anything?

  2. #2
    minoverette's Avatar

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    Oct 2007
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    Did you try focusing your pressure washer wand on the spot? Not too much though or you might rip the mesh. Good luck!

  3. #3
    Ruthless Cow's Avatar

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    I use a pressure washer with the pressure turned off and the nozle set to the most narrow setting. But I suck - maybe someone else here can offer some more experienced advice.

  4. #4
    phoondaddy's Avatar

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    What minoverette said. Emulsion remover will take it all away, not good.

    Either way, it's best to just start over and get what you want.

    Welcome to the world of screen printing!

  5. #5

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    thanks folks, appreciated!

  6. #6
    Premium Member
    Andymac's Avatar

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    you can carefully use some emulsion remover on a spot or bit you want to remove, but you have to be super careful with a brush and where you put it.

    then rinse it off quick with water before it get on good areas.

    sometimes a q-tip is a good way, and once rinsed and dried, you can paint in again with blockout.

    but a reburn is sometimes better if an edge or key element is screwed up
    Andymac

    services www.squeegeeville.com
    equipment www.tmiscreenprinting.com

    Todo es empezar.

  7. #7
    Premium Member
    Tenebrini's Avatar


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    Quote Originally Posted by Andymac View Post
    a reburn is sometimes better if an edge or key element is screwed up
    I've felt this pain a few times. Although sucky, you might be happier in the long run.

  8. #8
    l.stalions's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andymac View Post
    you can carefully use some emulsion remover on a spot or bit you want to remove, but you have to be super careful with a brush and where you put it.

    then rinse it off quick with water before it get on good areas.

    sometimes a q-tip is a good way, and once rinsed and dried, you can paint in again with blockout.

    but a reburn is sometimes better if an edge or key element is screwed up

    Follow Andy's advice. Q-tips and a zero point brush with some emulsion remover will work perfect, as long as the emulsion you are removing isn't connected to the part or too close to the part you want to keep. Going in with block out will work great to redo any f*ck up.

    If it's too close for comfort use a q-tips with a small amount of water on both sides of the screen to slightly soften the spot, then rub it gently. If you put any pressure on the area you'll destroy it.

  9. #9

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    Ha! GOOD LUCK.. some times shit works sometimes it doesn't.. best thing to do is TRY!

  10. #10

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    I'm intrigued by this q-tip thing. Here's the area in question:



    You can see the smudgy parts by the three lines. I almost wonder if they'll look cool the way they are, you know -- happy accidents. Generally with art I'm into happy accidents.

    One thing I'm overjoyed about is that my screens actually burnt -- exciting stuff! Once we print, depending on how disastrous it is, I'll share a process thread so you can all admire the beer that we are drinking.

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