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  1. #1
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    strawberryluna's Avatar


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    Default etsy poster - oh noes not anozzerh process thread?!

    oh yes, it is indeed. since i haven't really done one before AND i use and pins i figured why not post the photos that i took while printing a poster for Etsy.com here. you know, on GP - a screenprinting and poster fourm?

    crazy, right. crazy like a fox.

    this is an abbreviated process, the bulk of the photos are on my flickr page here: Flickr: strawberryluna's Photostream

    so, this is the upstairs front screenprinting studio at AIR, where Tuesday Open Studios happen and where lots of folks print. When it's a sunny day, we try to go by the natural light as long as possible:



    The backroom of AIR's screenprinting shop That table to the right is on wheels and usually in the middle of the room. The large fluroescent light gizmo is actually a large light/exposure source for exposing GIANT screens. No really, some of AIRs screens are 6' x 10' deals. It's awesome.

    Past the creepy black (light blocking) curtains is the washout booth, exposure unit and screen drying cabinets.



    inside the washout/exposure room. Weights to press down the padded blocks that go on the screens live here, as do films waiting to be burned onto fresh screens. Coated, unexposed screens dry in the space below, where the black sheeting starts.



    This is the exposure unit, directly behind the above shelf and cabinet and next to the washout booth (with a good wall in between, whew!)



    Where screens hide while drying, underneath either the exposure unit (hence the heavy black (light blocking) sheeting.



    This is the exposure unit., turned on - but note! DO NOT place your screen onto the light table while it is on or you will be exposing your screen!

    Just wanted to show how the screen looks, with the film positive placed underneath, "true."

    I didn't take a photo of the next step, which is to place some sort of light-blocking element onto the screen. We use boards covered in padding and felt so as not to scratch or tear the screens. Then add weights to the board to make a nice flat, tight screen-film connection to get a good clear burn.

    Turn on the light (varies from set up to set up, ours is 7-8 minutes), set the timer and come back when she's done.


  2. #2
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    Andymac's Avatar

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    show me the pins woman!
    Andymac

    services www.squeegeeville.com
    equipment www.tmiscreenprinting.com

    Todo es empezar.

  3. #3
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    strawberryluna's Avatar


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    Washout booth, with exposed screens. I like to wet them down and let them sit for a minute, the stencil falls out way faster that way. Exposed screens need to be "washed out" as the photo-emulsion will fall away with the help of water, from everywhere that your film showed information or black. Basically, you are making a stencil.

    The exposed emulsion where no information was is now harded, baked, and won't wash out with just water, but the areas where your films had art will.




    Action shot!



    All sprayed out and ready to dry.



    Donated box fan, 2/3 work-worn screens drying, drying rack waiting for business, print shop floor.



    Hinge clamps and no vacuum table (hence the pin registration), but a nice sunny window for me to look out whilst I print.


  4. #4

  5. #5
    JustinHelton's Avatar

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    yaaay, Ive always wanted to see this AIR place.

  6. #6

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    (sounds like a buncha Communists to me)

  7. #7
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    strawberryluna's Avatar


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    heh. here come the PINS assjackers!

    Takach registration hole punch! Set paper into the guide, pull/press the handle down and SHAZAM you've got holes that match the registration pins perfectly.



    Mit paper:



    The paper is set onto a pin that I attached to an old plastic lid from a coffee can, thus forming the tab, which gets taped down to the table (print surface, strata, etc) once the paper has been registered and is in perfect position.



    There are many ways to register your design to your paper.

    Thanks to Bobby Dixon of Austin, Texas, who is likely sippin' on some sausages right now, I use the following method:

    1. I tape my films to my paper, in the exact place where I want my ink to print. Depending on the design I am taping the first color only, or all of my films to my paper. It all depends on the design and what elements I have to orient my art. In this case, I had to tape down my last color's film first and then my first color's films because without the last color's information I had no idea where to place the first color. (Printing can be like playing 3-D checkers.)

    2. Once I have my films oriented on the page where I want them, I put my registration pins into the holes where I will want them to be for the print run. I also tape down a large clear film under the screen onto the table. I will slide my paper with the films taped on under that clear film, then print onto that film. This way, what I have printed will not move but I can move my paper around under it and see just exactly where I need to tape my registration tabs down to keep my paper in the exact same place from print to print.

    3. Now that registration is set, and my first paper (with films stil on it) is taped down securely to the pins, I remove the clear upper layer of film, remove the films with information on them from my paper, and start printing that color!

    See, it's not that hard.



    Another view of the films taped down and the clear oversheet of film, about to be printed.



    Better view of the registration pins and tabs. These are in place and will remain that distance throughout the run.

    Note the photographer's shadow. Arty!


  8. #8
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    strawberryluna's Avatar


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    hold please, i need some more iced tea. back in 2 & 2!

  9. #9

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    where do you print your seps?

  10. #10
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    strawberryluna's Avatar


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    Ink plopped at the top of the screen and waiting for a flood pull. (More on that below.)

    I did leave the films taped to the paper below to show that you can kind of see it through the screen. That was removed before the first pull, though. Of course.

    Silly.



    One handed photo-n-flood pull.


    One print down!

    I usually set 2 pieces of paper at a time onto the pins so that the rhythm is: flood, print, lift screen, move one sheet, flood, print, lift screen and set 2 fresh prints onto the rack. Repeat.

    Like a million times.



    Another view with the screen up right after a print pull. Prrrrrrrrrrrreettttttttttttttyyyyyyyyyy.

    You can see lines and blobs of ink (dark green) sitting in the screen. Because the emulsion is hardened during exposure, that won't (or shouldn't) come through your screen.



    Prints on the rack, first color.


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