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  1. #1
    Premium Member
    NeroInferno's Avatar


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    Lightbulb [Screenprinters' Ring] DYE INKS FILMS, PIGMENT INKS FILMS or LASER FILMS?

    Hi people,
    referring to this thread http://www.gigposters.com/forums/scr...ml#post1467032 was born in me the insane idea to open a new topic.

    For your experience, are better dye inks films, pigment inks films, or laser films?

    Gently explain:

    a. the why (optional)
    b. the use you do of these films (print posters,t-shirts, stickers etc)
    c. which kind of film (material)
    d. the model of the printer
    e. the parameters/options you give at your printers (dpi, etc)
    f. the kind of mesh, and the number of the threads (you generally use)
    g. the emulsion and ink kind (Choice: Plastic, Waterbased, Both)

    [din din]

    Fabio

  2. #2
    squeegeethree's Avatar

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    We've hashed this out before but I'll bite.

    a. the why: Imagesetter and like types are the best everything else is a distant second. Kodalith was awesome. Laser and Xerox are never dark enough but sometimes that's cool. Inkjets cheap and reliable if you use it everyday and leaves a nice black.

    b. the use you do of these films (print posters,t-shirts, stickers etc)
    A nice printer will print not only the films but satisfy the need for one offs in all these catagories

    c. which kind of film (material)
    Precoated polycarbonate. They're all pretty much the same at 8.5"x11" but if you're going big (over 22"x30") and want to maintain your registration while outputting films, then rolls with thicker coating hold up best. IMO rolls of Chromaline's Accublack are the best at holding registration when tiling prints over 4'x5' as all the points still line up in the grid. Lexjet quick dry film is what I use for all else as it's less expensive. But there are even cheaper products out there. Personally I like water proof crystal clear film so I don't use much vellum for Digi output.

    d. the model of the printer
    Epson 9600 is my personal favorite but it's too big for most people. My 9600 has been running everyday for 5 years without fail. Thank you Sieko Corp. I also have a 9800 which is newer and supposedly better but it's optics don't recognize clear materials very well.

    e. the parameters/options you give at your printers (dpi, etc)
    250 dpi or better, play with unidirectional and bidirectional printing to see what works best for you, Only Black at 100% in the file. Pigment for me. not dye. I use a RIP only for halftones.

    f. the kind of mesh, and the number of the threads (you generally use)
    76 mesh, 110, 156, 195, 230 (our work horse), 380, and 420 mesh but I though we were talking about printers. For figuring out the lpi for each screen I divide the mesh count by four and that's the dot I use.

    g. the emulsion and ink kind (Choice: Plastic, Waterbased, Both)
    Lots of threads about this here. Dualcure Universal types only for me. Ulano RLXCL and Autotype Autosol 8000 is what I use. The Ulano RLXCL is a good emulsion that you have the option of dyeing or not. I like this option because when doing long runs of a mostly clear ink the emulsion dye sometimes contaminates your color. The expensive Autotype Autosol 8000 is very heavy in particles and gives me crisp edges coated 1/1 on my open meshes. Both of these emulsions are more expensive than most people need but I find mistakes and image breakdown cost me more money than a cheap emulsion will save me.

    h. other:
    Rapidograph and Koh-i-noor Acetate Ink 3071F. I really like to have these around and working all the time.
    Airbrush, I get some great effects on films using airbrush and 3071F and sometimes it's easier/faster to do gradients this way than through the computer.
    Also 3071F and Kuretake or Niji refillable WATER BRUSH pens. These are awesome and cheap. A clear plastic chamber that's easy to fill. yasnavbar.gif
    Ruby and Amber Lift are a must for any screenprinter to have as well. If you've never used them, get some to play with. Besides being fun to use, the crispness of the results can only be matched with imagesetters (or by running the Ruby/amber through your plotter/cutter.
    Frosted mylar and vellums works really well with lithocrayons. I've done prints entirely with Heavy Frost and Lithocrayons and they look awesome. I love how you can build up the gradient tones to make something look just like a lithostone or pastel.

    I spent the first 12 years of screenprinting with no computers instead I had the above and a photo darkroom.
    Last edited by squeegeethree; 02-16-2008 at 07:46 AM.

  3. #3
    Premium Member
    NeroInferno's Avatar


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    Hi squeegeethree,
    thank you for your answer. Now we see what the other screenprinters will answer.

    Interesting the point h. do you use the airbrush to give what kind of effects? You use it on a new film or on the original film?

    Thanks,
    Fabio

    ps. about the point f. I added it to give the opportunity to people who use different emulsions or films for different number of threads

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