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  1. #1
    michael_0's Avatar

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    Default colour separation printing technique

    ok, so i'm pretty sure someone just put their penis in my arse.

    just dropped the files for the separations for my high on fire poster off at the printers. usually i do my posters A3 so i can just print the separations out on my home printer as 2 A4 acetate sheets and tape em together.

    as an A3 high on fire poster would look brilliantly underwhelming, i decided to be a bit more extravagant and do it A2, getting the acetate seps printed up properly. these have just cost me 24 ($47) EACH, however.

    does anyone have any techniques they can share on doing large separations they can share? i know there's a way of doing it using thin paper and cooking oil but isn't that quite messy.....?

  2. #2
    DCM's Avatar

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    They usually cost me about £5 per A2 or A1 acetate, but i know some places are just shit and either won't do small runs like that, or if they do, will charge you stoopid amounts... which i'm guessing is what has happened.
    If you are doing A2, i would say you are best off just sticking to your usual method of sticking A4 sheets together. It's only 4 sheets, and it's not that huge a job to get right. It sure beats being $200 down before you have even started.
    The alternative is printing on to A2 paper (most shops will have a plotter that will cost you about £2 or so), and you basically rub oil onto the paper until it becomes transparent. Like a greasy kebab wrapper.
    I haven't tried this method, but i have whitnessed it go off with no bother at all. Although i am slightly unsure of it myself.

  3. #3
    Premium Member
    Drozd's Avatar


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    just find a cheaper printer
    'Death to Drozd/Long Live Drozd'

    www.lukedrozd.com

  4. #4
    3d glasses's Avatar

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    Default

    i grease up normal paper and have never printed using acetate..works alright for me

  5. #5
    michael_0's Avatar

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 3d glasses View Post
    i grease up normal paper and have never printed using acetate..works alright for me
    does it not get a bit sloppy with all that oil all over your screen, though...?

  6. #6
    B-DROID's Avatar

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    I used to use the oil method back in the States, no problem. I would take a cookie sheet and line it with foil (easy clean up), pour a bit of oil on it and spread it around, then put your sep on it and get it covered, let it soak a bit, flip it over. Pick it up once it is nice and even (maybe a minute) and let the excess drip off, plop it on the screen and use an old squeegee to work out any air bubbles. ta-da.

  7. #7
    michael_0's Avatar

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by B-DROID View Post
    I used to use the oil method back in the States, no problem. I would take a cookie sheet and line it with foil (easy clean up), pour a bit of oil on it and spread it around, then put your sep on it and get it covered, let it soak a bit, flip it over. Pick it up once it is nice and even (maybe a minute) and let the excess drip off, plop it on the screen and use an old squeegee to work out any air bubbles. ta-da.
    minimal sloppiness, then?

  8. #8
    michael_0's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by DCM View Post
    They usually cost me about 5 per A2 or A1 acetate, but i know some places are just shit and either won't do small runs like that, or if they do, will charge you stoopid amounts... which i'm guessing is what has happened.
    If you are doing A2, i would say you are best off just sticking to your usual method of sticking A4 sheets together. It's only 4 sheets, and it's not that huge a job to get right. It sure beats being $200 down before you have even started.
    The alternative is printing on to A2 paper (most shops will have a plotter that will cost you about 2 or so), and you basically rub oil onto the paper until it becomes transparent. Like a greasy kebab wrapper.
    I haven't tried this method, but i have whitnessed it go off with no bother at all. Although i am slightly unsure of it myself.
    apparently they have to put it through their colour process machine and that's why it's so expensive. another reason it's pissed me off is cos they printed some A2 seps for me when i did my mystery jets poster and it didn't cost me nearly as much.....

  9. #9
    3d glasses's Avatar

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    yeah well you kind of rub the paper it with an oiled up cloth rather than pour it on, then when it goes transparent leave it for a bit and then lay it on the screen..

  10. #10
    3d glasses's Avatar

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    oh and ive had teh same problem as that with people saying that they have to put it thru the colour machine as it wont come out solid black if they dont, but i found if your files are bitmap tiffs it should be fine in a normal black and white printer

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