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  1. #1

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    Is this akin to asking an artist what his creative process is? I hope not! I have a book on screenprinting that explains the various methods, but doesn't mention the use of computers to print out films (older book I guess). Do most of you handcut your own films or make photo-screens of your hand-drawn lineart. Any one print out films on your printer of your Illustrator/Freehand art? Do you then handcut the films or make a photo-screen?

    -matter

  2. #2

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    I use photoemulsion on generally prestretched screens (I wreck my hands if I stretch it by hand).

    For getting the art on there, I use photocopies or the art rubbed with vegetable oil to make them translucent enough for light to pass through, or rubylith, depending on how much area I'm covering, how I made the artwork.

    You can use vegetable oil on a computer print out (I've done this too), but an ink jet print tends to streak, so laser jet output is best to use in that situation, at least in my experience.

    I hate working with films (I've only done this when other people have made them and dont' understand that layers have to overlap, etc.), but lots of people on here use that method it seems.

  3. #3

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    Nolan-

    When you use your actual line art, is it ink on bristol board?

    -Matter

  4. #4

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    haha...I do almost all of my drawings on copier paper! How unprofessional of me! What will people think of me when they find out?!

    If you do it on Bristol (which I've done) just make a photocopy of it, but make your rubylith or whatever other type of separations based on the photocopy, NOT the original, coz the photocopy will ever so slightly distort the image and if your separations are based on the original art it may not line up exactly. Or you could scan it and print it out without any distortion (if you have a scanner/printer big enough to handle your art).

    Of course, I do this stuff by the seat of my pants, others on here are more professional about it and might have better pointers.

  5. #5

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    Hey, it's whatever works for YOU, right? Who cares if you use expensive bristol board or draw on post-it notes? It's the end result that matters the most. As long as you enjoy the process along the way...

    Thanks for your replies, I like learning about this stuff.

    -matter

  6. #6
    DaveGink's Avatar

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    Hey Nolen, My Pennywise poster was illustrated on two pieces of 8.5x11 brite white inkjet paper scotch taped together. So hey, whatever works (and is on hand), right?

  7. #7

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    matter,

    I just saw you're from colorado, a friend of mine is from out there and does a zine called Dimestore...I'm not sure if he sells it in record stores or not...if you see it, he printed all that with oiled photocopies...and oddly enough, there's a picture of me on the cover.

  8. #8
    Pedini's Avatar

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    I've used images photocopied onto acetate, but if you want something bigger than 11x17, you have to do an acetate collage. Very messy, but can have interesting results. If there is a blueline shop nearby, they will most likely be able to enlarge any sized black and white image (on copy-weight paper)onto big pieces of vellum. Don't do all the seperations this way though, as the scale is altered ever so slightly and if your design has tight registration between seps, you will be disappointed! Nolen is right, if you cut rubylithe to correspond to a key image, do so after you have photocopied or enlarged the image. I know of a screenprinting shop in my town that has a film output machine, but the film is only 12" wide.

    Make friends with a shop that has a photostat camera, and maybe they can get you real film at whatever size for cost. Or... you can be a funky purist and draw will screen filler or even crayons right on the screen!

  9. #9

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    dont' listen to that last thing biped said about drawign right on the screen with crayon or screen filler unless you are prepared to lose your mind! I respect people who have the patience, but that's too hardcore for me!

  10. #10
    Pedini's Avatar

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    Aw c'mon Nolen... don't discourage the guy from exploring the media from within! It's still easier than Lithography! (at least, the way I learned it) I think you have to be insane to be a good Lithographer.

    Anyway, keeping a crayon handy is a great way to correct pinholes you may have missed whilst preparing the screen.

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