Gig Posters

Posters: 156388 | Bands: 135994 | Designers: 11550                 
   
       RSS Feeds

Username:   Password: 
Register      

Social Networking Activity                 



 Bands  Designers  New Arrivals  Top Lists  Forums  Buy Posters  Submit  Merch Store  Advertise  Widgets  Help

Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Premium Member
    Andymac's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Van Isle BC Canada
    Posts
    11,759
    Comments
    278

    Default Hand printing with a counterweight system

    A few of you might not have experienced the joys of counterweighting your screen. This came out of a couple of conversations at FS with hand printers who were still jamming cans under the screen each print. I just finished building a vacuum table for a customer with one.... Try it, you'll like it...

    Some benefits....

    Faster

    Easier

    The concept is simple and most hand set-ups can be easily adapted.

    1. A weight equivalent to the squeegee and the screen with ink in it is attached to a small rope or ropes. the rope passes over a bar or through a pully or hook, and then down to the side of the screen frame. It is clamped to the frame with a small c-clamp.

    2. Weights can be a can full of pennies or metal bits, a jug of water, or any heavy object. Cans or containers that the weight can be adjusted are better than attaching a single weight, like a tire rim....

    3. When your screen is in the hinges, attach your c-clamp and cord. When the screen is down, the weight should go in the air, when the screen is up, the weight can rest on the ground or table surface. You will need to adjust your cord length to get this, but once it is done it is good for all screens of similar size.

    4. With a squeegee laid on the front or back or side of the frame (wherever it would normally sit in the up position during the print run) adjust your weight. the screen should come down and sit, and when you move it up it should stay there.

    5. To keep things even, especially on bigger screens you will want to have a clamp and cord on either side. In this case, the cords go over your pulley/hook/bar, and then attach to either end of a stick, or metal tube. the weight is attached to the centre of the this tube or stick.

    Here's a picture of the set up with a single cord and weight. the weight (that white can) is resting on the tabletop, the screen is up.
    If I push down on the screen, the weight rises. It is attached to the front corner of the roller frame with a small c-clamp.
    the frame it goes over is made of copper 1/2 pipe, mounted into 5/8 holes in the backbar.
    On a fixed table, you can run two 2x4's up the back and drill them out and shove a copper pipe through.
    You can also run it to hooks set in the ceiling.

    Andymac

    services www.squeegeeville.com
    equipment www.tmiscreenprinting.com

    Todo es empezar.

  2. #2
    Premium Member
    Unitus's Avatar


    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    minneapolis, mn
    Posts
    16,465
    Comments
    4253

    Default

    wes burlesque has rigged two of those at the studio i print at. it's genius.

    the third (smaller) printing table has a springloaded rolling leg that holds the screen up between pulls.

  3. #3

    Default

    whats wrong with stickin your head under there.

  4. #4
    Premium Member
    Unitus's Avatar


    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    minneapolis, mn
    Posts
    16,465
    Comments
    4253

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by newseamus
    whats wrong with stickin your head under there.
    i do that too.

  5. #5
    Premium Member
    Tenebrini's Avatar


    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    11,263
    Comments
    3381

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Unitus
    the third (smaller) printing table has a springloaded rolling leg that holds the screen up between pulls.
    I have one of those. It only fits on one of my screens though so it's irritating. I have a wooden bar that I screw into the side of my wood frames. The hole is loose enough so that when I pick the screen up, the leg swings down and the screen can rest on it.

    I'm screwed with the big screens though. The counterweight system seems like the next logical addition to my table. The can under the screen was lame last night.

  6. #6
    Premium Member
    sicknimich's Avatar


    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    A Warehouse
    Posts
    2,612
    Comments
    1416

    Default

    my brother stole a table top press from his high school that hadn't been used in like 20 years. (cutbacks on the arts) and it uses couter weights. i will try and borro my girlfriends digi cam and take some photos of it. it is pretty prehistoric but not a bad ideafor home shops!!! it is a screen clampthat has a bracket weleded on to it that has a slot cut in it and has a threaded weightthat attaches with a wing bolt so you can slide the weight back and forth to your liking i have been meaning to take a one and set a little table press. it a good option for sure!!!

  7. #7
    loco's Avatar

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Fresno, Ca
    Posts
    12,918
    Comments
    67

    Default

    Where I use to work they have a couple of these except they have an angle to them. It helps so your not having to push so hard. The ones over there are alot larger.

    -loco

  8. #8
    danieldanger's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    massachusetts
    Posts
    8,753
    Comments
    1386

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by newseamus
    whats wrong with stickin your head under there.

    im kinda famous for getting inky hair after a day of printing

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •