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  1. #1
    Premium Member
    u6crash's Avatar


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    Default Some silly questions about the business side of things

    So I'm ever slowly trying to make more art and get something set up to sell prints and original works. In addition to doing some screen printing (my studio is still under construction), I'll probably offer some giclée prints for sale. Maybe I'm worrying about nothing, but here are my questions.

    When putting prints up for sale (be it here, Etsy, Shopify, Big Cartel, whatever) do you worry about someone buying up all of one print and then them marking them up later having purchased all your inventory? If so, do you somehow restrict the amount of a print that is available at any time? Or would you simply celebrate a sold out print run?

    How consistent are you with your signature on things? On a screen print I just sign it at the bottom, generally in the border if there is one. Sometimes I do some painting and it seems odd to sign a painting with a pencil or pen, but also odd not to sign it at all. If you hand painted your name on the bottom of a painting, then made giclée prints of it, would you sign the print in addition to the now replicated painted signature?

    That's all I got for now, probably making a bigger deal of it than I need to. Thanks in advance for your input!

  2. #2
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    well, if you're just starting out, here's what worked for me:
    - when first starting to sell your prints, no reason to limit them, since your goal is to sell them. what other people do with them is their business. as you start to hopefully have more of a following, you can limit people how many prints they can buy, to make more people happy buying from you. but if you just have one customer and he wants to buy 20, let him, maybe he has a better trafficked poster website and your prints will be seen by more people via him (or her) selling them.

    - signature wise, i usually work my signature into my posters, so even if i don't sign them (and many times i don't sign band copies), they'll still have my name on them. but everything i sell on my own website i hand sign myself (not stickers, but all prints). people have come to expect that if they're buying it from me, it'll be hand signed / numbered.

    hope that helps, good luck!

  3. #3
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    u6crash's Avatar


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    Yeah, that kind of helps. I read somewhere that what people do for prints of paintings (that wouldn't otherwise have a signature) is to sell the print with a COA, so that's maybe an option too.

  4. #4
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    caribou's Avatar


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    i'd say if someone wants to buy 20 copies of one of your pieces, do it. maybe they're not going to flip them, but give them out as gifts...i sold ten copies of an art print to someone a few years back that gave them to friends and family for christmas. besides, how long would it take you to sell 20 copies to 20 different people? at the very least it clears up space for new inventory.

    i sign all of my prints, and usually hand write my name on paintings. i've seen a ton of giclees recently at work (mostly landscape stuff) that have the artists name painted on the original piece, then a signature in pencil below it in the margin. they're usually numbered as well. looks a little wierd with the double signature, but if a piece is numbered, i'd like to get a signature with it.

  5. #5
    squeegeethree's Avatar

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    Don't print the signature. Printed signatures are impersonal and hurt the value of the print. Some states/cities require by law a COA (NYC being one of them). So best practice is to just come up will a blanket COA that you can release with the print.

  6. #6
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    THE PiNCH's Avatar


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    Quote Originally Posted by squeegeethree View Post
    Don't print the signature. Printed signatures are impersonal and hurt the value of the print. Some states/cities require by law a COA (NYC being one of them). So best practice is to just come up will a blanket COA that you can release with the print.
    Certificate of Authorship?
    Coat Of Arms?
    Change Over Acknowledgement?
    Clunge Oil Aperture?

    ...Chasm Of Awe?

    ...I need to know!

  7. #7
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    Andymac's Avatar

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    Certificate of Authenticity.....We changed it to a Print Documentation after an artist correctly pointed out she didn't need a piece of paper to make it 'authentic'

    Personally, I think the COA or whatever you call it is a great idea, for a number of reasons.
    1. Contact info - Allows others, or people in galleries looking at your print to track you down and buy direct. Direct sales make the artist the most money
    2. Add value to the print....by including the info about yourself, the print, and the making of the print, the certificate adds value to a piece of paper with ink on it.
    3. Gives the owner something to talk about - framed and up on a person's wall, their firends come over and start admiring the new print - a certificate with the info on it allows the new owner to tell people a bit about the artist, the print etc
    4. Fight fakes and knockoffs - by defining the paper, and other things, the certificate allows people to identify repro prints or fakes by paper type, size, and other distinguishing marks
    5. For printers...we get jobs from other artists because our contact info is on the cert, which is in the file with the print at a gallery etc....we pick up jobs from artists who see it and contact us regarding printing

    Back to the beginning. Sell the fucking prints. Jesus. That's why you made them. the more of your prints that are out there, the more you will sell.
    Andymac

    services www.squeegeeville.com
    equipment www.tmiscreenprinting.com

    Todo es empezar.

  8. #8
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    and a double sig on a print is a sure sign it is a copy, not an original print. this started with offset lithos...'oh, it's number 345/83,000' and continues with Gickles.

    from my wife, who frames...."don't sign prints in the white, do it in the image - if you are matting a print, a lot of times you want to go tight to the colour in the print - when you sign it in the white/margin, you can't do this. And people who sign round prints down at the bottom...can't use a circle mat cutter on them."
    Andymac

    services www.squeegeeville.com
    equipment www.tmiscreenprinting.com

    Todo es empezar.

  9. #9
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    Thanks for all the replies. The multiple answers help me feel a little better about this not being a stupid question. My original inclination, as far as signing giclées go was to not sign the original until the prints were made and then sign them all. Then I made this one that might get made into a print (which is a bit darker than it appears on my screen):


    And I thought, "Where am I going to sign this?" Looking at some of the posters I bought I don't see a consistent theme either. In fact, I have a Wilco gigposter I picked up at the venue so I'm pretty sure it's authentic, but it doesn't have a signature at all. I've got a Justin Hampton poster on dark purple that I now see is signed in gold ink, so maybe the answer is to get a good thin paint pen or something. Another thing I like about the Justin Hampton print is it is embossed at the bottom with his logo. I always thought it would be neat to have an embosser, so maybe this is a good excuse to get one.

    Thanks again!

  10. #10
    squeegeethree's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andymac View Post
    .can't use a circle mat cutter on them."
    Matting prints is gross.

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