Gig Posters

Posters: 155148 | Bands: 135198 | Designers: 11479                 
   
       RSS Feeds

Username:   Password: 
Register      

Social Networking Activity                 



 Bands  Designers  New Arrivals  Top Lists  Forums  Buy Posters  Submit  Merch Store  Advertise  Widgets  Help

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 24
  1. #11
    Premium Member
    Andymac's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Van Isle BC Canada
    Posts
    11,697
    Comments
    277

    Default

    "In fact it's the Clients who order the least or are the hardest to maintain that seem to complain the most. "

    Bingo. This is a type of identifiable customer - always complains, they will be slow to pay, they always want a deal, and their art is late or screwed up. They are a negative drain on the company resources, and unless they are bringing some real big or high profile jobs, they aren't worth the bother.

    The only way to deal with this type is to flag them, put a DA charge on their job (DA - dicking around) and if they say anything, tell them to fuck right off and send them packing. Send them to Hazzard or Prismtech or some other printer. Spend your time on your good customers. They say ('they' being business pundits) that 80% of your work comes from 20% of your customers....so hunt for more of the 20%, and eliminate the bad ones.

    I've had a few of them come back, after this treatment.....they can turn into good customers. Remember, customers are like dogs. If you don't train them, they'll shit on your floor and piss on the rose bushes.
    Andymac

    services www.squeegeeville.com
    equipment www.tmiscreenprinting.com

    Todo es empezar.

  2. #12

    Default

    Unfortunately that is all completely out of my control.

    I'm the frog their trying to throw in boiling water and their desperately trying to keep me from jumping out. All the other frogs have been sitting in this pot since the water was tepid and are now all being slowly boiled to death.

    We also don't send Customers packing nor do we pass on these costs properly in most cases. It's all out of my hands, all I can do is what I'm being tasked to do or ignore it completely and start floating the resume.

    There isn't one piece of advice in this thread that has been incorrect but when put in context against the "I don't have a choice factor" what am I to do?

  3. #13
    squeegeethree's Avatar

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Brooklyn, NYC
    Posts
    6,611
    Comments
    62

    Default

    Buy the Electro spectrophotometer and then blame it when colors don't match. It's doesn't have any feelings or children to feed. But the truth is that you will still need to spot check every job for color match. Also you said you had all dudes working with you. Find some ladies already they are far less likely to be color blind. Better yet try and hire a Tetrachromat.
    Tetrachromacy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  4. #14
    Premium Member
    Andymac's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Van Isle BC Canada
    Posts
    11,697
    Comments
    277

    Default

    "There isn't one piece of advice in this thread that has been incorrect but when put in context against the "I don't have a choice factor" what am I to do?"

    Your best. Beer helps.
    Andymac

    services www.squeegeeville.com
    equipment www.tmiscreenprinting.com

    Todo es empezar.

  5. #15
    squeegeethree's Avatar

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Brooklyn, NYC
    Posts
    6,611
    Comments
    62

    Default

    Andy, I said ladies help... you said beer helps... pretty sure ladies and beer don't mix as well as one would imagine.

  6. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Andymac View Post
    "There isn't one piece of advice in this thread that has been incorrect but when put in context against the "I don't have a choice factor" what am I to do?"

    Your best. Beer helps.
    I've resorted to stronger alternatives than that as of late. Thank God I have my side business to keep me happy, otherwise I'd be completely nuts lol.

    Quote Originally Posted by squeegeethree View Post
    Buy the Electro spectrophotometer and then blame it when colors don't match. It's doesn't have any feelings or children to feed. But the truth is that you will still need to spot check every job for color match. Also you said you had all dudes working with you. Find some ladies already they are far less likely to be color blind. Better yet try and hire a Tetrachromat.
    Tetrachromacy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    I'm actually using the ES for these projects and aiming at ∆E at around 1 with my unacceptable point being anything above 1.5 ∆E.

    Quote Originally Posted by squeegeethree View Post
    Andy, I said ladies help... you said beer helps... pretty sure ladies and beer don't mix as well as one would imagine.
    You must be younger than I am and not have to pay child support. When I was younger ladies certainly helped but now that I'm older they seem to hinder more than help.

  7. #17
    Premium Member
    crosshair's Avatar


    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    6,761
    Comments
    3866
    Items for Sale

    Default

    new favorite thread.

  8. #18
    squeegeethree's Avatar

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Brooklyn, NYC
    Posts
    6,611
    Comments
    62

    Default

    How long are the runs that you are doing by the way? What's a small run for one of these customers as opposed to a large. Are you even confident you can keep color accuracy between the first print and the last.

    Nah, I'm younger than Andy but old enough to have a couple of yungins myself and I have employed enough peeps to think printers can be any gender and that there is a difference between everyones color matching abilities all other things being equal.

  9. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by squeegeethree View Post
    How long are the runs that you are doing by the way? What's a small run for one of these customers as opposed to a large. Are you even confident you can keep color accuracy between the first print and the last.
    I go out of my way to mix ink without transparent colors in them so long run color shift is minimum. Typically our printers are pretty smart about how they use ink in that they'll add fresh ink once then scrape once so you don't get the cement guardrails that you see some of the "less energetic" (shall we say) printers get.

    Mind you, long run is a relative term as our largest runs seem to be between 1500 - 5000 sheets (max), the typical job is between 100 - 250 production sheets.

    Quote Originally Posted by squeegeethree View Post
    Nah, I'm younger than Andy but old enough to have a couple of yungins myself and I have employed enough peeps to think printers can be any gender and that there is a difference between everyones color matching abilities all other things being equal.
    So you're just less jaded than me lol.

    I couldn't agree more with your thoughts on color perception as everyone is different.

    An interesting sidenote; one of my longest term Ink lines is supplied by Norcote, they just make fantastic UV Ink. All of the employees in one department (I think it's color lab) are all women.

  10. #20
    Premium Member
    Andymac's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Van Isle BC Canada
    Posts
    11,697
    Comments
    277

    Default

    Women in Screenprinting...nothing to do with validating colour, but c'mon, what guy can tell you the pantone number for 'taupe'....


    December 09 Shop Talk column from Screenprinting magazine

    I used to play in a ska band called the Rude Boys, and we had a song – “Women Are Taking Over the World.”. The ladies seemed to like it – they all danced and cheered the song. An article I read recently noted Canada ranks 25th and the USA 31st in an annual global survey of 134 countries that assesses the participation of women in economic and political life. (World Economic Forum The World Economic Forum) Canada and the USA’s overall gender gap scores were 71, where 100 indicates equality, and zero represents inequality. Iceland was first at 82, and Yemen (I didn’t make this up) last at 46. In today’s world of screenprinting, at least the one I inhabit, the women seem to be - if not outnumbering the men, at least keeping up with them.

    Just look at the masthead of this magazine – Gail Flowers is the new editor! And one of the most out-there advocates of screenprinting to government and the public is SGIA VP Marci Kinter.

    Over the last year, I’ve been in a lot of new-to-me shops and studios, from the University of Victoria here on Vancouver Island, to Screwball Press In Chicago, from La BourgoisieSerigraphie and Seripop in Montreal, all the way to Black Swan Screenprinting down in Houston.

    Every one of those shops has a female owner or lead printer. That’s a change from a few years back, where the typical graphic shop might have had a woman artist or clerical worker, but there seemed to be a gender curtain between the back of the shop where the presses ran, and the front end. Not any more.

    A typical example of today’s new breed of screenprinter is Iris Sautier. Originally from Switzerland, trained as a graphic designer in Europe, she got bit by the screenprinting bug while in school. After establishing her graphics business in Montreal (clients include the Montreal Canadiens Hockey Team) she set up a well equipped screenprinting studio with a semi-auto graphic press, 2 hand tables, and a 6 color t-shirt carousel that allows her to produce a wide range of items and to work with other designers and artists in Montreal who want to further explore the medium. She also offers classes on weekends drawing students from all over Quebec.

    University of Victoria closed the fine art printmaking department a few years back, a victim of retiring teachers and rationalized obsolescence – print is dead, didn’t you hear? Recently, the printmaking department has come back to life, and the people leading the charge include the Dean of the Faculty of Fine Arts, Dr. Sarah Blackstone. She has pushed to reopen the department and modernize the equipment, and along with instructor Megan Dickie now has summer sessions going full steam, with a full year-round curriculum planned in the next few years. The ratio of female to male students in the printmaking course is 8:1, further proof that not only is the interest high, but we can look forward to more practicing female printmaking artists in the future.

    If there is any question whether women can do the job in the workplace, we only need to ask the question ‘Who holds the ‘world’s record’ for 4/c t-shirt printing?’ In 2005, Maddie Sikorski, on loan from New Buffalo Shirt Factory in Buffalo, NY, set a single operator speed record of 1805 shirts per hour on a 12 color press at a trade show in Orlando. Said Jon Weiss, founder and owner of New Buffalo, “Every day, Maddie operates our auto presses at speeds in excess of 1200 shirts per hour. She’s the best of the best!”

    My own experience bringing women into the screenprinting workforce reinforced the view that women could take on any job in the screenshop, and do it as well as the typical male printer. After growing our business to the point we had to hire more press operators we endured a series of bad nightmares with supposedly skilled screenprinters – co-incidentally all male, most incapable of printing at the level we required. They were unaware of their shortcomings and unwilling to learn to do it better, so we started over. Taking advantage of a government sponsored program to train new hires from scratch, we took on a number of women who wanted to learn screenprinting, and found they excelled at it. At one point, we had more female printers than male, and quite honestly, we were a better shop for it.

    In contrast to our male squeegeedragger hacks who refused to recognize or change their habits – who consistently had to argue with the production manager about setups (“yeah, but this is the way I always do it!”) always forgetting to read the workorder,(“Ah, gee, I guess I missed that!”) always rushing production (“Oh, I must have missed that spot in the center of the print…”) – our female printers were meticulous and detail oriented. As they became more confident in their abilities and familiar with the machines, their speeds and production quality matched and then surpassed many of these male workers, who had been printing for 10-15 years.

    Women make up half this world. Do they make up half your screen shop workforce?
    Andymac

    services www.squeegeeville.com
    equipment www.tmiscreenprinting.com

    Todo es empezar.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •