Gig Posters

Posters: 156255 | Bands: 135961 | Designers: 11547                 
   
       RSS Feeds

Username:   Password: 
Register      

Social Networking Activity                 



 Bands  Designers  New Arrivals  Top Lists  Forums  Buy Posters  Submit  Merch Store  Advertise  Widgets  Help

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23
  1. #1
    {LG}'s Avatar

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Montucky
    Posts
    49
    Comments
    0

    Default Ink control with clam shells?

    This is probably a genuinely stupid question but how do you keep ink in the print area on a clam shell press? having a hard time with this, it keeps running to the back and not leaving enough in the image area. this is on a cameo and I'm either loading at next to zero dwell or letting it come down and flood until I have just enough room to get my paws under there.

  2. #2
    squeegeethree's Avatar

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Brooklyn, NYC
    Posts
    6,644
    Comments
    62

    Default

    I'm assuming you are using floodbar. Try buying a winged floodbar for your press. This helps keep the ink in front of the squeegee.
    When your press is a rest is the screen flooded or unflooded?
    Do you have enough pressure on your floodbar. The FB should be pushing hard enough against the screen that the screen it actually depressed and bent through the contact. Simply touching the screen is not enough pressure.

  3. #3
    {LG}'s Avatar

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Montucky
    Posts
    49
    Comments
    0

    Default

    I have a standard flood in there right now. Pretty wide and I'm not seeing ink moving to the left/right, just to the back. We do have some winged ones but I need to see if any will work at the Cameo's angle.

    Do you have enough pressure on your floodbar. The FB should be pushing hard enough against the screen that the screen it actually depressed and bent through the contact. Simply touching the screen is not enough pressure.
    I think that's the problem, the edge of my flood is just kissing the screen. That would make sense that the ink is just flowing under the bar into the back. So you think I should actually see it depressing into the screen a little when it's down?

    I'm either printing so the screen is flooded at rest or moving real fast, about 200pcs/hr. Unless the head is cycling, it's flooded and in a 3/4 down position if that makes sense. That's working out gangbusters with the Cameo and the image placed in the right spot, there just isn't enough ink in the flood since it's all pooled up in the back.

  4. #4
    squeegeethree's Avatar

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Brooklyn, NYC
    Posts
    6,644
    Comments
    62

    Default

    Our floodbars are really pressing hard against the screen. Not knowing it's ok one would think it's going to rip the screen there's so much pressure. So it's not depressing the screen a little but a lot.

  5. #5
    {LG}'s Avatar

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Montucky
    Posts
    49
    Comments
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by squeegeethree View Post
    Our floodbars are really pressing hard against the screen. Not knowing it's ok one would think it's going to rip the screen there's so much pressure. So it's not depressing the screen a little but a lot.
    Interesting. I call that a "hard flood" or a fill. We do that with plastisol inks when printing Ts and such but we use a "soft flood" when using waterbased inks where we just want a thin layer on top of the screen, not a pre-loaded stencil.

  6. #6
    Premium Member
    Andymac's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Van Isle BC Canada
    Posts
    11,757
    Comments
    278

    Default

    I think SQEE3 is right, add more pressure. You might want to check the floodbar and ensure it hasn't worn in the center.

    Now, if you had almost any other press than your model T, you would have a little switch that allowed you to either flood/print, or print flood. Your Cameo was designed back when they still used wooden frames and slack silk mesh - flooding on that before a print would have left ink dripping through the screen.

    Having said all that, I've seen a lot of good work come off a Cameo.
    Andymac

    services www.squeegeeville.com
    equipment www.tmiscreenprinting.com

    Todo es empezar.

  7. #7
    {LG}'s Avatar

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Montucky
    Posts
    49
    Comments
    0

    Default

    Thanks you all. I will try harder flood pressure today.

    I like the ol' model T. Less adjustment is kinda liberating but I wish it had air over the squeegee and flood for quicker setup there.

    Andymac, when flooded at rest I still get epic drippage under there. Maybe this is, again, related to not enough flood pressure.

  8. #8
    {LG}'s Avatar

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Montucky
    Posts
    49
    Comments
    0

    Default

    Harder pressure helped tremendously. Still a bit wonky but much better overall. It is quite a bit more pressure than you would expect. Thanks again.

  9. #9
    Premium Member
    Andymac's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Van Isle BC Canada
    Posts
    11,757
    Comments
    278

    Default

    There is a fundamental difference in the ink consistency with WB graphic ink and textile ink, the WB ink wanting to (usually) run a lot thinner than the thixotrophic inks used in textiles.

    So if you flood with some runny WB ink and it is thick on top, it will use its own weight to ooze the ink through the screen. A flood with pressure sheers this ink and leaves a light film in the screen, which - all things being in balance (including higher mesh counts, proper ink consistency, and speed and proper squeegee pressure) allows for nice prints. The same effect is present in hand printing when a person floods the screen a couple of times because they didn't get a good flood in one go - the extra ink usually results in a blur.

    there are a lot of other factors involved, but a good flood helps produce a good crisp print.
    Andymac

    services www.squeegeeville.com
    equipment www.tmiscreenprinting.com

    Todo es empezar.

  10. #10
    {LG}'s Avatar

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Montucky
    Posts
    49
    Comments
    0

    Default

    That makes sense to me. We print textiles all day, every day with plastisol and wb. You're right, we can flood softly over top the screen with the WB inks and no drippage. With plastisol we use a very hard fill stroke, like printing the screen in the air and then the print stroke is simply shearing the ink out and pumping/dropping it onto the shirt.

    Flatstock specific inks are certainly a whole 'nother deal. The flood/fill here is more like with plastisol on the shirts strangely enough- you're driving the ink into the stencil and filling it up rather than pooling it across the top.

    On the Model T I've been running with these big heavy diamond chase frames that happened to have some mesh that survived their journey and survived us tensioning them up to high 20s n/cm- standard thread 170, 190, 300 ish according to the mesh count determiner-a-jig. When I hand print posters I do it on the shirt press and use our shirt screens instead- typically 225/48, 310/30, 330/30 -thin thread meshes with a lot of open area. They get drippy too when left for too long without printing. The drip and the super agressive dry in are the only two things I don't much care for with the TW.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •