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  1. #21
    squeegeethree's Avatar

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    You print out the water/409 on a waste sheet the first few prints before moving on to your good stock

  2. #22
    Hellgate Industries's Avatar

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    Do you apply the solution half way through a print run when necessary? I have a spray bottle atomizer that I use to mist the screen with water when i can tell that its getting too thick, and i cant see through the screen well enough. All Im saying is I think I was doing it wrong, because every time I tried it, I pulled the ink through, ruined a few pieces of newsprint until it was gone, and then it was gone. Not sure what effect its having on the entire print run if I pulled it through and its gone. but I want to believe! Everyone says that its the best thing! I wanna be a convert.

  3. #23
    squeegeethree's Avatar

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    Well it's supposed be be gone after a few prints. Imagine that the dry emulsion is a sponge (which it is). So the idea behind wetting the screen first is to get your emulsion fully saturated with water that isn't coming from your ink. You wet the whole image area and all the emulsion outside the image area as well. Doing so will allow you to keep your details open longer and you shouldn't have to mist the screen as often, or at least one less time. I would also avoid doing your thick flood at the beginning. Your thick flood at the start may push too much ink through and offset on the back of your screen which will speed up the whole clogging issue not help it.
    At the end of the run if you have a lot of ink on the back of your screen you aren't doing something right.

  4. #24
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    Andymac's Avatar

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    Instead of misting to thin the ink partway through a run, add some water to your existing ink in your mixing bucket and then add it to the ink on the screens. (always add the ink to the ink puddle after you have pulled your flood, this minimizes blurs etc) Misting direct always causes water spots for me, I only do it if I have a block or need to stop for a bit in the run - even then I mostly use a soft sponge to spread the water at the start, if you mist direct you get really runny blobs.

    We have a pack of 1000 24x36 newsprint sheets under the press, ready to pull out and print on. We save these and use them over and over to print off on, then save them for wrapping paper - I have a lot of people get stuff from us, they end up putting the wrapping paper up on their wall.

    if you do this, it also saves on good paper during runs, learn to anticipate a shit print.
    Andymac

    services www.squeegeeville.com
    equipment www.tmiscreenprinting.com

    Todo es empezar.

  5. #25
    Hellgate Industries's Avatar

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    wow. thats a great idea, to roll the prints in the used newsprint! nice one. I will begin doing that tomorrow. Idea: stolen!

    ok, so its more about wetting the emulsion than it is about wetting the image area right?

    as for the misting, yes, misting is a tricky affair. I went all over the place looking for an atomizer, and NOT something like a windex bottle. the one I have is intended for what I can only assume is some sort of fashion purpose, its very feminine looking. I can tighten it down so that it only sprays out something akin to a cloud - no drops at all. and even with that, I hold the bottle about 12 inches above the screen, and then spray up towards the ceiling. it falls down ever so softly and gently, (kinda romantic, actually) and leaves zero drops or runs or blurs on the next print. oh, and I always do it when the screen is in flood mode.

    works great.

    do you buy your newsprint in bulk, or do you just buy pads at the art store like I do?

    thanks!

  6. #26
    jonkeefe's Avatar

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    Solid info in this thread.

    We print a lot of shirts, and this step is CRUCIAL when printing opaque water-based white ink. If you skip it, you can literally fuck your screen on the first stroke.

    Also crucial if you print with house paint.

    (Stop printing with house paint, seriously)

    Staples sells newsprint in pads and by the roll, super cheap.

  7. #27
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    Andymac's Avatar

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    bulk carton. 1000 or 2000 or something. You can get free or extremely cheap rolls from local newspapers (if they print) they can't use the last bit on the press. But for me I'm lazy and don't like cutting....i buy the sheets. Last me 5 years or more. NEVER buy wrapping paper for Christmas etc either.

    Actually, I have thought many times....there's money....specialty stores sell individual sheets of wrapping paper.... come up with a cool line, do it on recycled newsprint with WB inks, call it ecowrap, make $$$$.
    Andymac

    services www.squeegeeville.com
    equipment www.tmiscreenprinting.com

    Todo es empezar.

  8. #28
    squeegeethree's Avatar

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    BIG WARNING about rolling finished prints to be delivered in waste prints.
    I used to do this. Then one day a client called and said all of the edges of her nice white paper were stained bright orange.
    I had wrapped her edition in craft paper that was printed florescent orange and while the edition faces were protected with glassine the edges were not. In the end I had to redo the job cause she wouldn't just let me trim a tiny bit off the edges.
    So the moral to this story is be careful putting crappy printed paper in contact with your deliverable work.

  9. #29
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    Andymac's Avatar

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    or use inks that don't come off.

    We also don't wear white gloves, we are savages here in the north.
    Andymac

    services www.squeegeeville.com
    equipment www.tmiscreenprinting.com

    Todo es empezar.

  10. #30
    Hellgate Industries's Avatar

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    awesome advice all around!

    question tho: what is the REAL reason everyones is hating on house paint?
    I know its a little harder to use, but theres gotta be something more behind it.
    Id be satisfied if someone can tell me the real difference between the two (what I would guess are pretty similar) mediums

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