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Thread: Paper Prep

  1. #1
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    Default Paper Prep

    I have a print coming up that will require extremely precise registration. I have heard of people prepping their stock by printing clear first to seal against the paper growth that can occur after the first color is printed.

    What ink/sealant are you using for this?

    Do you just do a full bleed giant stroke of clear?

    How effective is this technique?

    And are there drawbacks I should be aware of?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Hopefully Crosshair replies to you because i've seen a process thread where he did this. I believe you can use transparent base (or extender), or if you want to prep with a light shade of color, that will work as well. If i remember, I think Crosshair used white or a very very light blue.

  3. #3
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    Default

    I do this often. I'm doing it again tomorrow. I got the trick from Luther (squeegeethree).

    I don't think it really matters what you use. I use TW wb inks so I use the clear flat base, plain or with a tint if the print demands it.
    Printing full bleed is probably even more effective, though I haven't done that so I can't say from experience.
    If you really want to go nuts you can flip the paper over and seal the back as well.

    I've found the single solid flood very effective, and though it isn't a silver bullet I've gotten damn near perfect registration with it. If there is a wild change in temp or humidity your paper will still craze and the registration will still be effected.

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    Thanks.

    I can usually get very tight registration, but the print I am planning really does call for "exact" registration.

    Would you say, if a design allows, printing the colors with less coverage first would also help? Kind of ease the paper into the idea of being printed.

  5. #5
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    Yeah, if it needs to be pinpoint reg then proper prep can make a world of difference.
    In order of importance.
    1. Always print in the same orientation for the whole run (this should be obvious but I'm putting this out there)
    2. Prerack paper for at least 24 hours (over the weekend even better)
    3. Put the hardest to register parts of the image closest to the reg corner.
    4. Seal the front completely (clear flat base), seal the back as well if you are paranoid.
    5. Start off with large flat of color to prime the image area.
    6. Use the same screens and mesh for the entire run printed in the same orientation.
    7. Keep the paper racked right up until you are ready to print (unless you are expecting an extreme weather change then unrack and wrap in plastic and wait out the weather).

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by squeegeethree View Post
    Yeah, if it needs to be pinpoint reg then proper prep can make a world of difference.
    In order of importance.
    1. Always print in the same orientation for the whole run (this should be obvious but I'm putting this out there)
    2. Prerack paper for at least 24 hours (over the weekend even better)
    3. Put the hardest to register parts of the image closest to the reg corner.
    4. Seal the front completely (clear flat base), seal the back as well if you are paranoid.
    5. Start off with large flat of color to prime the image area.
    6. Use the same screens and mesh for the entire run printed in the same orientation.
    7. Keep the paper racked right up until you are ready to print (unless you are expecting an extreme weather change then unrack and wrap in plastic and wait out the weather).
    I'm gonna print this out and hang it in bathroom. When I have stomach problems, and I'm in there for awhile, I will come out with better ideas. Seriously, one of the best numbered lists I've read about printing. I gotta try sealing.

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    "4. Seal the front completely (clear flat base), seal the back as well if you are paranoid."

    whatchu mean by this? the entire size of the sheet?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Josh Rickun View Post
    "4. Seal the front completely (clear flat base), seal the back as well if you are paranoid."

    whatchu mean by this? the entire size of the sheet?
    Yes, seal as much of the paper as possible. We only do this if we are going to have extremely tight registration though.

    As far as #6 goes. Different mesh stretch differently. Also as screen will stretch more in the weft direction. So if you can figure out the warp direction that might be helpful. I can't tell so I just make sure that I keep my screen oriented, whether vertical or horizontal, the same for the job and hope that my screen stretchers were consistent about about weave placement.

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    Quote Originally Posted by squeegeethree View Post
    Yes, seal as much of the paper as possible. We only do this if we are going to have extremely tight registration though.

    As far as #6 goes. Different mesh stretch differently. Also as screen will stretch more in the weft direction. So if you can figure out the warp direction that might be helpful. I can't tell so I just make sure that I keep my screen oriented, whether vertical or horizontal, the same for the job and hope that my screen stretchers were consistent about about weave placement.

    Screen stretch can be a bitch. I've had to use c-clamps before and I've heard of people using NAILS to move the mesh!

  10. #10
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    Default

    I wonder - if yr sealing both sides of the paper, would it just make sense & save time/$$ to just buy coated paper?

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