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  1. #1
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    Default Can a 196 t/inch mesh hold a 75PPI dither dot?

    Hello,
    can a 196 t/inch mesh hold WELL a 75PPI (seventyfive ppi) dither dot?

    Thank you,
    Fabio

  2. #2

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    Is PPI the same as DPI? If so I think that would be fine. I can hold 300 DPI dither dots on a 280 mesh with no blowout, so 75 on a 196 should work.

  3. #3
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    Hello edwardo,
    thanks for the reply. Yes PPI is the same like DPI, it is referred to pixels of the monitor instead of dots during the printing.

    Do you start with a 300ppi input file, then switch to dither dot mode and insert output 300ppi? and you can keep it very well on a 280t/inch mesh?

    How this can be possible? The tests I've made show decent results with an output at 175ppi on textile!

    Fabio

  4. #4

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    This is what I was taught:
    take your mesh count, we'll use 200 as an example, then divide by 3. So around 66-ish is your smallest possible dot assignment in photoshop.

    I've been able to do it by dividing by 4, as well, but it's best to have your emulsion/burn time figured out and solidified before you try it. I got some washout by doing this, so I would advise against it.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by CloneArmy View Post
    This is what I was taught:
    take your mesh count, we'll use 200 as an example, then divide by 3. So around 66-ish is your smallest possible dot assignment in photoshop.
    More the output PPI number is lower more the dither dot size is big. Are you referring to a printable dot or a good dot that makes its work before it becomes grainy?

    I've been able to do it by dividing by 4, as well, but it's best to have your emulsion/burn time figured out and solidified before you try it. I got some washout by doing this, so I would advise against it.
    I had quite good results starting with an input file at 175PPI, then assigning it a 1775PPI like dither dot output and printed on a 255 t/inch mesh. I used to dip the screen in water a while before the real washout, in this manner the unexposed emulsion softened, included the one in the small dots. Then I sprayed water normal and gave a final blast using the power washer, from far and opening the gun outside the screen. Then I sprayed another one water to remove the possible emulsion debris generated from the power washer. The result was quite good, like said, but I prefer bigger dots. Ink on bigger dots sticks better on fabric. For this reason the second test was an input file of 175 or 200 PPI (I can't remember) then I outputed a 75 PPI dither dot and combined it the same artline converted with halftones, printing it on a 196 t/inch mesh. The result was great I hope to show you soon.

    Fabio

  6. #6

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    Printable half-tone line size is what I was refering to.
    PPI = Pixel per inch, DPI = dots per inch, LPI = lines per screen. When you change your image to a bitmap and select a halftone in photoshop, it asks for you to choose an angle and an LPI. Select your angle, then take your mesh count and divide by 3 that'll give you a decent LPI for your halftones. Most will suggest dividing by 2 instead, to remove any risk of losing dots.
    I probably wouldn't use an image size smaller than 200ppi and no higher than 300ppi, but I guess it depends on the result you are going for.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by CloneArmy View Post
    Printable half-tone line size is what I was refering to.
    PPI = Pixel per inch, DPI = dots per inch, LPI = lines per screen. When you change your image to a bitmap and select a halftone in photoshop, it asks for you to choose an angle and an LPI. Select your angle, then take your mesh count and divide by 3 that'll give you a decent LPI for your halftones. Most will suggest dividing by 2 instead, to remove any risk of losing dots.
    I probably wouldn't use an image size smaller than 200ppi and no higher than 300ppi, but I guess it depends on the result you are going for.
    Mate I'm speaking about dither dots not halftones!
    Fabio

  8. #8
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    Default

    Most would suggest dividing by 4.

  9. #9
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    Default

    PPI, DPI, & LPI are not interchangeable terms FYI.

  10. #10

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    I don't use Photoshop's built-in dithering functionality through the bitmap option, I use a plugin which dithers the image with your choice of algorithm. I use an Epson 3000 for positives, Ulano 925WR emulsion. Once exposure time got locked in things were good. I had problems in the beginning with detail loss which I traced back to poor positive contact during exposure. Little dots are incredibly sensitive to light undercutting in my experience.

    PPI, DPI....I checked with a louvre and Epson 3000 seems to top out, detail-wise, at printing a 300 DPI dither before the dots run together. Maybe Crosshair can add to this.

    I haven't tried printing this level of detail on shirts yet, but I'm planning to try.

    Fabio, consider printing dither samples at different DPIs, then putting them on one positive and exposing, that's a decent way to see what level of detail you can hold.

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