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  1. #1

    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Kansas City, MO
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    Default Building my own setup

    Hey everyone! Finally joining the world of the forums.

    Im also getting things together to start building my own setup, as Im leaving the school studios for good soon. I pretty much know what I need to start, but I wanted to see if anyone here had suggestions for brands, screens, emulsion, exposure etc. I also would like to know how you guys can expose screens without using an exposure unit. What kind of bulbs and how far they are from the screen and how long to expose would be very helpful. Thanks for any tips! I will start posting some work soon.

  2. #2
    Premium Member
    NeroInferno's Avatar


    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Rome, Italy
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    807
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    Default

    Hello Mike,
    welcome on board!

    1) you should buy the Andy MacDougall book titled "Screenprinting Today", because it's a very good source of informations about screenprinting. Once you read it you barely needs to ask anything else. On this book there are also plans to build a vacuum printing table.

    2) Ink brands: from my experience the inks from TW Graphics are the best and the happily used between the screenprinters in the USA

    3) Emulsion: Ulano

    4) Screens: I'd like to suggest you directly roller frames but to stretch them it's a pain without a tensioner. Buy initially 2-3 screens thinking to the size of your future editions. Be sure to add some space between the the frame and your stencil (this is written in the book)

    5) Exposing screens without an exposure unit: it's possible but if you want quality this is not for you. The main problem without a vacuum exposure unit is undercutting..this means the light (UV tubes, halogen lamps, sun, etc.) passes under the black zones of the film, because the film isn't in strict contact with the emulsion on the screen. I really suggest to buy a vacuum exposure units also used. This prevents you TONS of errors and pains during the pre-press step. You can also build it with a bit of bricolage (DIY) skills..isn't nothing of trascendental.

    6) Bulbs: go for UV tubes if you are burning normal screens. If you want to build you vacuum exposure unit be sure to find first the longest UV tubes possible. Then project all the size of you exposure unit. UV tubes generally are near to the frame respect the old super powerful 5000W lights. This depends from the power of your UV tubes. Mine are 9 tubes, 40W eachone made from Philips, 120 cm around long and far from the glass around 40cm. If you need exact measure I'll take them.

    It's always a pleasure to see a new trooper between the screenprinting addicted.
    Fabio

  3. #3

    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Kansas City, MO
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    Default

    Thanks so much, this helps quite a bit! I ordered that book a while back, still haven't gotten it yet, but should soon. And yeeeesss, I have become addicted ha

  4. #4

    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Kansas City, MO
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    Default


    Here is one of my first posters, for a local bands show in Warrensburg, MO. It's quite old, so please, any critique is welcome!

    I've developed this method of working, could be called a digital woodcut. I use a layer mask and 'carve' into the black area, making the image. I've since just moved on to actually using scratchboard and scanning it in, this makes for a better hand drawn look.

  5. #5

  6. #6

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    Kansas City, MO
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    Default

    Yeah I saw his blog, very good, there are a lot of answers in there

  7. #7

    Default

    Mike, dig your poster. Do you do the text the same way? Like arrange it in a layer with a real font and then "carve away" to give it the hand done look? Cool effect.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Kansas City, MO
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Casey C-P View Post
    Mike, dig your poster. Do you do the text the same way? Like arrange it in a layer with a real font and then "carve away" to give it the hand done look? Cool effect.
    Thanks I appreciate. I did do that for the type. Im working with hand drawn type now in my more recent work.

  9. #9

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    May 2011
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    Default

    Here are a few prints I've done recently. I've been working with using scratchboard to get to my final image. I've also been recently utilizing blends (somewhat successfully). Any suggestions?







    Here are the original scratchboards:



  10. #10
    Premium Member
    NeroInferno's Avatar


    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    Rome, Italy
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    Default

    hello Mike,
    nice style. come on you're ont he right path. Next step is to add a background and screenprint them

    You should make a tutorial of your style. Scratchboard is very fascinating. Next times try also to add the "highlights/light points" with white ink over the black...this is the oldest method used in the comic industry.

    Fabio

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