Gig Posters

Posters: 155198 | Bands: 135235 | Designers: 11483                 
   
       RSS Feeds

Username:   Password: 
Register      

Social Networking Activity                 



 Bands  Designers  New Arrivals  Top Lists  Forums  Buy Posters  Submit  Merch Store  Advertise  Widgets  Help

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 33
  1. #1
    Premium Member
    windflame's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    2,260
    Comments
    7

    Default The process of making some books.

    Last year I taught myself how to bind books so I wouldn't have to pay a couple hundred bucks to have my portfolio bound at the end of the year. I've come to enjoy the tedious process, and I thought I would share it with GP.

    I do know there are a few of you that have gone through this, so if you see anything that looks wrong or that could be done better, please let me know!

    Although the initial investment isn't small (a hundred or so should get you all of the supplies you need), I haven't had to re-up on anything but book cloth and binding board since I first purchased everything.



    Some of the supplies you'll need.

    -Awl
    -C Clamps
    -Wax Paper
    -Waxed thread
    -Needles
    -Some glue
    -Glue
    -"Super" (the mesh stuff)

    Also, if you have shaky hands and fatty fingers (like me) get tweezers, they will help in multiple parts of the process.



    I used the laser printer at my school for some cheap (free) output at 11x17. These are separated by each signature in the book.



    Page by page needs to be folded in half and then collated per signature.







    After the signatures are folded, be sure to label the signature with what order it appears in. It can get confusing easily if you don't have page numbers.



    Double check that the back page of the previous signature matches up with the first page of the next (before you fold).



    And TA-DA, all done. 7 signatures, 4 copies of each, folded.



    Now you're going to have to punch holes using the awl for the thread to go through. I create a guide to make sure everything lines up.



    Now punch the holes in all of the signatures following the guide.



    Once all of the signatures are punched, organize them in to individual books.





    Time to get your thread and needles ready. The hardest part of the process is threading the needle.

    More to come.
    Last edited by windflame; 12-19-2009 at 08:26 PM.

  2. #2
    Premium Member
    windflame's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    2,260
    Comments
    7

    Default

    Forgot a few things on the supply list. You'll need "tapes". its basically cloth ribbons. Since I can't seem to get a good shot of me sowing and I'm all done now, so the images below are from a guys site. You'll see what his tapes look like, mine are MUCH skinnier and it's just because I screwed up when I ordered. They still work.

    I always use WAY too much thread, but it's not a horrible thing. If you are making for than one book, you just keep using the left over thread. For my books, I used four lengths of my arms fully spread. It lasted for all four books.



    The basic idea of a Kettle stitch.



    Starting the threading.



    Threading through the inside through the next closest hole.



    Around the first piece of tape



    And around the second.



    Starting the second signature.



    Tightening it up



    Back out through the next end of the second signature.







    Starting the third signature.



    Back out through the end, the kettle truly beings.





    A bit more work, and there it is!

  3. #3
    squeegeethree's Avatar

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Brooklyn, NYC
    Posts
    6,613
    Comments
    62

    Default

    Nice work mark

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    163
    Comments
    7

    Default

    Hey Mark, you ever used a Teflon bonefolder? When I was making books a few semesters ago, I would gradually build up glue on them and would have to toss them. Supposedly the teflon doesn't let glue stick.

  5. #5
    Premium Member
    windflame's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    2,260
    Comments
    7

    Default

    Next up, making the endsheets. This, among the super and the tapes are what hold the book block to the case.

    My endsheets are just blank 11x17 sheets folded in half (same as the book block). I could have dressed them up, but due to time constraints I didn't. You want this paper to be slightly thicker than the book stock, but still workable. I am using Mohawk Superfine text, 100#.




    Here's mine sewn. I have already finished one, that's why there's one missing.



    Endsheets folded



    A hard edge to paint glue over so it only gets where not covered.







    Laying the endsheet on.





    Flip it over, do the same and then weigh it down for 10 min.



    Tape the tapes down so they will be out of your way.



    Add wax paper to both sides



    Clamp it down



    Apply glue to just the spine.



    Add the super



    get your hands dirty and spread the glue evenly



    Pretty good, I'll add a bit more in a few minutes after it dries some more.

  6. #6
    Premium Member
    windflame's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    2,260
    Comments
    7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RUFUS View Post
    Hey Mark, you ever used a Teflon bonefolder? When I was making books a few semesters ago, I would gradually build up glue on them and would have to toss them. Supposedly the teflon doesn't let glue stick.

    I'll have to check it out, thanks a ton for the suggestion. I dont really use my bone folder around glue so I haven't had too much trouble.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    107
    Comments
    7

    Default

    awesome process pics.... keep it coming. i've been looking at doing this sometime soon. it looks like a big tedious mess of fun (in a good way)... kind of like screenprinting.

  8. #8
    Premium Member
    boatdreams's Avatar


    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Chicag? Oh.
    Posts
    2,409
    Comments
    728

    Default

    So far, so good. I want to see more!
    justinsantora.com
    a letter of resignation

    "put the immersion on your mensch with a scrub-coaster. then print with a 70 durometer skyguy"
    -Steve W

  9. #9
    Premium Member
    windflame's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    2,260
    Comments
    7

    Default

    Alright, so the spine is dry, time to cut it down to size.



    Measure out your edge and double check everything.



    Line up a triangle to make sure you're somewhat square.



    clamp the triangle in to place




    Cut, slowly, light pressure, watch the fingers.



    Rotate and repeat. All of a sudden you are finished.



    Then walk up the street and get a delicious everything bagel with bacon cheddar cream cheese.
    I know it looks, unappetizing, but after the first bite you'll know why it's a required part of the process.



    Don't forget to pick up a french toast bagel for later.


    More to come, headed to the store in a bit to grab some book board.

  10. #10
    Premium Member
    windflame's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    2,260
    Comments
    7

    Default

    Cutting down book board is one of my least favorite parts of the process. Even when cutting with the grain it is a total bitch. Instead of using a regular xacto, use a box cutter. Your fingers will thank me later.



    Be sure of your measurements before you start cutting. Although I'm not going to go in to exactly how to measure for a book (since I'm still figuring it out), make sure you are diligent in figuring out both the gap between the spine and the covers and also the size of the spine.





    I'm going to be doing a blind emboss of a shape, after completing one of the books already, I've come to realize that text works MUCH better with this. The beer can doesn't quite look as good as results I've had in the past.















    Up next, making the case and putting it all together.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •